Professor Paul Cartledge, Chairman of Marathon2500, A.G. Leventis Chair of Greek Culture, Cambridge

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Upcoming Free Events

Marathon2500 Lecture Series - September 2010 - June 2011

Cost: free

Register for the next lecture:
Tuesday, October 12 at 7:00pm ET - live at Georgetown and via free webinar/teleconference
Professor Peter Krentz 
"The Battle Itself" 

Register for all remaining lectures.

This eight-part lecture series is free to all registrants, and conducted via phone and web with the world’s leading classicists, scholars and sports experts. Made possible by the generous sponsorship of Citrix Online, which has made all of its teleconference and webinar facilities available for free for the thousands of Marathon2500 participant

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Overview of all lectures

Paul Cartledge, Cambridge/NYU, Tue Sep 28 @6pm ET, "The Context and Meaning of the Battle"
Listen to the podcast  

Peter Krentz, Davidson College, Tue Oct 12 @ 7pm ET, "The Battle Itself"

Victor Davis Hanson, Hoover Institution, Wed Nov 10 @ 1pm ET, "Life of a Soldier—Greek and Persian"

Thomas Harrison, University of Liverpool, Tue Jan 18 @ 1pm ET, "The Persian Perspective"

Dean Karnazes, world-renowned ultramarathoner, Wed Feb 9 @ 1pm ET “The Battle and Modern Sports

Thomas Scanlon, UC Riverside, Tue Apr 5 @ 1pm ET “Sports in the Ancient World

Robert Strassler, Independent Scholar, Tue May 10 @ 1pm ET “Herodotus and the Invention of History”, 

John Marincola, Florida State University, Wed Jun 8 @ 4pm ET “Epilogue: What happened after the Battle"

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Details on all 8 lectures

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Tuesday, September 28, 2010 at 5:30pm EST

“The Context and Meaning of the Battle of Marathon: Why we are celebrating the 2,500 year anniversary”

Listen to podcast here

Paul Cartledge, Hellenic Parliament Global Distinguished Professor in the History and Theory of Democracy at New York University and A.G. Leventis Professor Greek Culture, Cambridge University will talk about the context and meaning of the Battle of Marathon – and why we are celebrating the 2,500 year anniversary. A world expert on Athens and Sparta in the Classical Age, Professor Cartledge was chief historical consultant for the BBC TV series The Greeks and the Channel 4 series The Spartans, presented by Bettany Hughes. He is also a holder of the Gold Cross of the Order of Honour and an Honorary Citizen of (modern) Sparta.

Location: NYU Center for Ancient Studies (and live via teleconference from anywhere in the world)

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Tuesday, October 12, 2010 at 7pm EST

“The Battle Itself” with Professor Peter Krentz, Davidson College

Peter Krentz  is W.R. Grey Professor of Classics and History, Davidson College, where he has taught Greek and Roman history since 1979. His book, The Battle of Marathon, was published in July 2010 by Yale University Press ( ISBN: 97803001208

Location: Georgetown University, Washington DC and via teleconference/web from anywhere in the world

Free registration: http://marathon2500-2.eventbrite.com

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Wednesday, November 10, 2010 at 1pm EST

“Life of a Soldier—Greek and Persian” with Professor Victor Davis Hanson, Hoover Institution and Fresno State University

One of the leading authorities on the life of ancient soldiers, Professor Hanson was a full-time farmer before joining California State University, Fresno, in 1984 to initiate a classics program. Hanson is the author of some 170 articles, book reviews, and newspaper editorials on Greek, agrarian, and military history and essays on contemporary culture. Today he is the the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and in his Marathon2500 lecture he will share his expertise on the life of an ancient solider.

Location: Teleconference from anywhere in the world

Free registration: http://marathon2500-3.eventbrite.com

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Tuesday, January 18, 2011 at 1pm EST

"The Persian Version: What did the Battle of Marathon look like from the Persian side?" with Professor Thomas Harrison, University of Liverpool

The Rathbone Professor of Ancient History and Classical Archaeology, Professor Harrison’s research on the Achaemenid Persian empire will be discussed (he has a forthcoming book on the topic) and, based on those insights, he will address the Battle of Marathon from the perspective of the Persians.

Location: Teleconference from anywhere in the world

Free registration: http://marathon2500-4.eventbrite.com

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Wednesday, February 9, 2011 at 1pm EST

“The Battle of Marathon and modern sports” with Dean Karnazes, world-renowned ultramarathoner and Greek-American.

As noted by Professor Paul Cartledge, the ancient runner Pheidippides was really an “ultramarathoner.” As a result of that face, the Reading Odyssey is fortunate have to  one of the top ultramarathoners in the world speak to us about the modern sport. Proclaimed, "The fittest man in the world" by Men's Fitness magazine and one of the “Top 100 Most Influential People in the World” by Time Magazine, Dean Karnazes is an internationally recognized endurance athlete and bestselling author. His most recent endeavor was running 50 marathons, in all 50 US states, in 50 consecutive days, finishing with the NYC Marathon, which he ran in three hours flat.

Location: Teleconference from anywhere in the world
Free registration: http://marathon2500-5.eventbrite.com

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Tuesday, April 5, 2011 at 2pm EST

“Sports and War” with Professor Thomas Scanlon, University of California-Riverside.

Both sport and battle were "contests" for the Greeks, agones, in their terms.  We will here look at the fascinating and puzzling legend(s) of Pheidippides (or whatever his name was), ancient long-distance messenger runners ("day runners" hemerodromoi) as a class, ancient footraces in the stadium, perhaps a bit about the Olympic truce (on the theme of sport and war), the Marathon Race in the modern Olympics, and modern long-distance running.  The common thread is the Greek and our own contest culture.

Department Chair of Comparative Literature, and Director of Comparative Ancient Civilizations at the University of California, Riverside, Tom Scanlon's research is on Greek and Roman sport, and Greek and Roman historical writing; his  teaching interests encompass most areas of Greek and Roman literature, language, and culture, including courses on ancient sports, religion, gender, and mythology.
Location: Teleconference from anywhere in the world

 

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Tuesday, May 10, 2011 at 1pm EST

“Herodotus and the invention of history”, Robert Strassler, Independent Scholar

Editor of the Landmark Herodotus, Landmark Thucydides, Landmark Xenophon and forthcoming editions on Ariane and others, Robert Strassler is widely acclaimed for making the work of these ancient Greek historians accessible to modern readers. In his lecture, he will talk about Herodotus, the first historian, and how in writing about the Persian Wars – incluiding the Battle of Marathon - Herodotus invented history.

Location: Teleconference/webinar from anywhere in the world

Free registration: http://marathon2500-7.eventbrite.com

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Wednesday, June 8, 2011 at 4pm EST

“Epilogue: What happened after the Battle of Marathon”, by Professor John Marincola

Professor Marincola (Ph.D., Brown) is the Leon Golden Professor of Classics at Florida State University. The editor of the Penguin Herodotus, Professor Marincola specializes in Greek and Roman historiography and rhetoric and in this final lecture of the Marathon2500 series, Professor Marincola will talk about what happened after the battle.

Location: Teleconference/webinar from anywhere in the world

Free registration: http://marathon2500-8.eventbrite.com